Unfortunately, the coronavirus outbreak has ravaged the U.S. job market and dimmed the prospects for Americans to stay employed in retirement. A stunning 41 million people have filed for unemployment benefits since the global pandemic was declared a national emergency in March. Add the fact that the risk of suffering the worst COVID-19 outcomes rises with age and it's easy to understand why retirees can expect big challenges in seeking part-time work right now. Work From Home Jobs
Believe it or not, you don’t have to be a CPA to start bookkeeping. Just sign up for a bookkeeping course at a community college or even online (such as this course from The Accounting Coach). Once you complete a course, you can start earning, and the median salary is reportedly $34,000. (Some stay-at-home bookkeepers I've spoken with personally make more than $70,000.) Are Work From-Home Jobs Real
A work from home job can be any position that does not require you to be in an office. There are a wide range of work from home jobs. Some companies offer opportunities for employees in traditional roles to work remotely for all or some of their workweek. These jobs often use technology for meetings, assignments, and collaboration. This practice is called telecommuting. Other work from home opportunities may include jobs such as customer service representatives for which companies will hire remote workers, or part-time virtual assistants to manage work which does not require a physical presence in the office.

Social networks are a hot spot for work-at-home danger. One company called Easy Tweet Profits claims you can make up to $873/day online. They even claim one person earned $400,000/year using their method of tweeting your way to success. The catch? By signing up for their program you agree to be charged just under $50 per month! There are a whole host of other companies with similar names (usually involving “make money” or “make profits”) that suggest social networking can be a cash cow. But their game is all the same: Whether you’re talking about something you see on Craigslist, eBay, Facebook, Twitter or whatever’s the next hot thing, you’ve got to be wary. Are Work From-Home Jobs Real
•The website has no contact information. A legitimate business has a way for you to reach them. Look for an "About" page that offers information on the company or CEO, along with a phone number, address, or contact email. (Try calling the number to see if anyone answers.) A website with only a contact form and no other way to get in touch with an actual human is suspicious. Work From Home Jobs
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